science policy

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Meet a Microbiologist: Kimberly Walker

Like many young scientists, Kimberly Walker took to her natural surroundings for study. As a child, she would do experiments on ants near her house. After a B.S. in medical technology, she pursued a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology. She studied the molecular pathogenesis of Gram-negative bacteria, specifically Bordetella pertussis, Proteus mirabilis, and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

She is fascinated by the secretion systems of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria use different forms of secretion to transfer proteins from within the cell to the exterior. Secretion systems have many functions, whether to emit toxins or to build extracellular structures. “They are brilliant. Type II is my favorite,” she says. (more…)

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Snapshots from the March for Science - Boston

For today, I’m taking a break from writing about microbiology. Thousands of people gathered in cities worldwide for the March for Science to support science, research, and evidence-based policy. Recent cuts in science research funding, climate change denial, and general disregard for the future of our planet and our health all fueled our need to do something. But the science march only reflects a greater issue: the public perception and understanding of science and its role in our lives. It shows a need for more science outreach, science education and the infrastructure to achieve these goals. Hopefully, the March for Science will spark conversations about the importance of science in our lives. It is only when the country as a whole support science that tangible outcomes in policy can occur. (more…)

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The CDC Climate Change and Health Meeting is back on... sort of

After just one week of the Trump presidency, it is already obvious that the war on science has begun. Trump's pick to run the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvany, questions whether government should fund research at all. Scott Pruitt, nominated to lead the EPA, actively denies climate change and in the past tried repeatedly to sue the EPA. In the last week freezes on EPA grants, bans on EPA and USDA employees from talking to the public about their research, and the possibility of censorship of scientific data and reports have all become realities in this uncertain time for science. (more…)